Facebook F8 2018: What Marketers Need to Know Ahead of Facebook’s Annual Conference

F8, Facebook’s annual developer conference, returns this week (May 1 and 2) in San Jose, CA at the McEnery Convention Center.

F8 offers developers, marketers, and anyone with a keen interest in the future of social media, a glimpse into what’s ahead for Facebook in both the short and long-term.

Last year, Facebook wowed onlookers with a range of eye-catching VR features, Messenger updates, and camera upgrades. So what’s ahead for this year’s conference?

Recap: Check out our full F8 2017 rundown here.

Here’s everything you need to know about Facebook F8 2018, including some key sessions to keep an eye on and predictions for F8 2018.

We’ll be sharing all of the most important Facebook F8 updates once the conference is completed, check back on Thursday for the full roundup. If you’re keen to watch F8 live you can attend one of its international viewing events in your area or watch it online.

What to look out for at F8 2018: 3 key areas of focus

1. The future of the News Feed

The News Feed is ever-evolving and back in January, Facebook announced its ‘meaningful interactions’ update-one of the largest, most consequential News Feed updates of recent years.

The update stated that Facebook will be prioritizing posts that create meaningful conversations, especially those from family and friends. This means that Facebook will be favoring posts from family and friends over public content from Pages as they believe a person-to-person connection is more valuable than a person-to-page connection.

The below video from Facebook explains a little more about this update and how the Facebook News Feed works:

http://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Ffacebook%2Fvideos%2F10156988765141729%2F&show_text=0&width=560

Off the back of this update, many marketers and brands were curious whether their organic reach would take another hit. During F8, I expect Facebook to address the News Feed and their focus on improvements for the coming 12 months and beyond-maybe we’ll even see a hint that Facebook could eventually move away from the News Feed altogether.

More on the ‘meaningful interactions’ update: The New Facebook Algorithm: Secrets Behind How It Works and What You Can Do To Succeed

Relevant F8 sessions:

  • What’s New with News Feed (Tuesday, May 1 @ 1pm PST)

    Head of News Feed Adam Mosseri outlines the future of News Feed, from the shift to connection to how his team is improving experiences on the platform.

2. Instagram for Business updates

Facebook recently opened up Instagram’s API for the first time, enabling Instagram business profiles to schedule Instagram posts, view analytics and more.

With more than 25 million active business profiles and more than 2 million advertisers on Instagram, it’s clear that Facebook sees a huge opportunity for Instagram to deliver further value to its business users. At F8, I expect we’ll learn a lot about the future of Instagram’s API and how Facebook will look to better serve business users and differentiate between business and personal profiles on Instagram.

Relevant sessions:

  • The Instagram Graph API – What’s In It For You? (Tuesday, May 1 @ 1.30pm PST)

    Meet the Instagram Graph API, a way to better manage your business on Instagram by scheduling posts, viewing organic insights and much more. In this session, you’ll learn how our past informs our future and leave with a clear picture of our vision for developers on the Instagram Platform.

  • How Stories Ads and Business Profiles Help Grow Your Business on Instagram (Tuesday, May 1 @ 1.30pm PST)

    Learn how businesses are using Instagram Stories Ads and Actions on Instagram business profiles to drive value. Hear Instagram Stories Ads best practices and learn about business profile partner integrations.

3. Privacy, security, and data at Facebook

Whilst previous F8 events have focused on the long-term future of Facebook and “what’s next”, showcasing plenty of eye-popping concepts like VR hangouts, drones, and more. At F8 2018, it feels like Facebook might focus a little more on the “here and now” and how they might fix some of the privacy and security issues that have been widely discussed in recent weeks.

Facebook has already made some positive progress here by making privacy tools easier to find and introducing new privacy experiences for everyone on Facebook as part of the EU’s General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR).

Relevant F8 sessions:

  • Security at Facebook Scale (Tuesday, May 1 @ 1pm PST)

    You’ve heard that Facebook is investing heavily in security and safety in 2018. Come learn how we approach security to protect our community and company.

  • Keynote (Tuesday, May 1 and Wednesday, May 2 @ 10am PST)

    Little has been announced about the contents of the keynote sessions just yet, but I would imagine privacy, security and data sharing might be key topics for one, or both, sessions.

What are your predictions for F8 2018?

Facebook F8 is right around the corner and I’d love to hear what you’re excited to learn about and any predictions you might have for Facebook’s flagship developer conference.

What exciting, fun news do you think Facebook would share at the upcoming F8 conference? Do you have anything on your wish list?

If you’re keen to learn more about F8 or check out the full schedule you can do so on the F8 website.

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How to Schedule Facebook Posts to Be More Efficient and Get Better Results

Imagine this scenario: You have planned to post once a day on Facebook this week.

On Monday morning, you log in to Facebook and navigate to your company’s Facebook Page. You spend some time crafting the perfect post and wait for the supposed best time to post. You read that 3pm is a good time as people are taking a break from work and checking Facebook. So you wait…

At 2:55pm, you go back to the browser tab that has been opened since 10am. When the clock strikes 3pm, you hit “Publish”. Woohoo!

And then you repeat that for the next four days.

If that’s not too far from your day-to-day experience, I would love to suggest a simple tactic that can help you get better results and make you a better marketer…

Scheduling your Facebook posts.

Keen to find out more? Let’s read on.

How to Schedule Facebook Posts to Get Better Results and Save Time

Buffer can help you with Facebook scheduling, managing multiple Facebook Pages, and more. We would love for you to give it a try and see the difference.

3 benefits of scheduling your Facebook posts

You might be wondering, “the way I post on Facebook is just fine. Why do I have to change?” Well, here are three top benefits of scheduling your Facebook posts, compared with publishing it manually yourself.

(Oh, and if you are thinking that Facebook might penalize you for using a third-party tool, we’ll discuss that in just a moment.)

1. Maintain consistency and quality

The biggest benefit of scheduling your Facebook posts is to ensure that you’re posting consistently and to maintain the quality of your posts. Quantity and quality.

When you are scheduling your Facebook posts, you’re essentially planning ahead.

Buffer scheduled Facebook posts

For example, on Monday, you plan out all five posts for the week. Because you’re scheduling the posts to be published automatically, you won’t miss posting something even if you are busy – consistency. And because you dedicate time to crafting your posts in advance (rather than thinking of something on the spot every time), you can create higher quality content – quality.

2. Reach a wider audience

Publishing a post on Facebook directly is mostly fine… until you want to post at a time outside of your working hours to reach your audiences at different times of the day. You might have to excuse yourself from a dinner just to hit the publish button. Or worse, wake up in the middle of the night to do that.

When you schedule your posts, your posts will be published automatically at your chosen times. Whether it’s 7pm or 2am, it’ll almost seem like you published it manually yourself.

This way, you’ll be able to reach more people around the world who are checking Facebook at various times of their day. This is especially helpful for businesses with an international audience but also businesses in places where the population is spread across several time zones (e.g. US and Europe)1.

US population by time zone

3. Become more efficient

Finally, scheduling your Facebook posts can make you a better marketer.

According to the American Psychological Association, numerous studies have found that multitasking reduces one’s productivity. While switching between crafting a Facebook post and your other tasks for the day might not seem like much, research has found that “even brief mental blocks created by shifting between tasks can cost as much as 40 percent of someone’s productive time”.2

Multitask vs Focus

Just consider the things you can do if you get back that 40 percent of your time!3

Does Facebook penalize posts from third-party tools like Buffer?

While scheduling Facebook posts sounds attractive, many people have a concern once they research into scheduling…

Facebook doesn’t seem to like third-party tools.

It is often said that Facebook penalizes posts from third-party tools by showing the posts to fewer people organically than posts published directly on Facebook.

How true is that?

We recently did an experiment with Buffer, Hootsuite, and CoSchedule to see if that’s true. We found that there wasn’t a significant difference in reach whether we scheduled posts using a third-party tool or published posts directly on Facebook. Some scheduled posts from third-party tools even reached more people than the Facebook posts published directly on Facebook.

How to schedule Facebook posts with Buffer

So how do you schedule Facebook posts? There’re several methods.

Facebook itself offers a native feature that allows admins and editors to schedule posts to a Page or a Group. Here’s a quick guide from Facebook on how to schedule Facebook posts.

If you are managing multiple Facebook Pages (or multiple social media profiles), we hope the best way for you would be to use Buffer.

How to schedule a Facebook post in four simple steps

  1. Go to your Buffer dashboard
  2. Select your Facebook Page or profile
  3. Craft your Facebook post
  4. Schedule your post

1. Go to your Buffer dashboard

Once you’ve signed up for Buffer and connected your Facebook Page (Group or profile), you’ll be brought to your Buffer dashboard. Here’s how it’ll look like:

Buffer dashboard

2. Select your Facebook Page or profile

Next, select the Facebook Page or profile you want to post to, in the left-side column and click on the composer (“What do you want to share?”). A popup where you can craft your tweet will appear.

Buffer dashboard: Create a post

Here are two quick tips for you:

  • If you have connected multiple social media profiles to your Buffer account, be sure to select the Facebook Pages(s) that you want to schedule posts for.
  • If the post is suitable for other social media networks like Twitter, you can also select those profiles and create scheduled posts for them at the same time.

3. Craft your Facebook post

Next, let’s create some content!

What content should you be sharing? Here are some ideas (and examples) for your inspiration:

Post edu-tainment content. We found that content that is either educational or entertaining often performs well on Facebook. Best if it is both educational and entertaining (hence “edu-tainment”)!

http://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbufferapp%2Fvideos%2F1910627722342999%2F&show_text=1&width=476

Curate top content. Curating and sharing top posts from our peers in the industry has helped us grow our Facebook reach significantly. These pieces of proven content have often become our best posts in terms of reach, which also grew our engagement and Page Likes.

http://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbufferapp%2Fposts%2F1893490264056745&width=500

Share videos. Video has been and still is the most popular content type on Facebook. Buzzsumo conducted a research on 880 million Facebook posts found that video posts have the highest average engagement and twice the level of engagement of other post types on average4.

If you schedule videos with Buffer, your video will appear just like you uploaded it directly to Facebook – which is important for reach and engagement.

http://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbufferapp%2Fvideos%2F1943669395705498%2F&show_text=1&width=560

4. Schedule your Facebook post

Once you’ve crafted your post, you have a few scheduling options:

  • Schedule Posts: Schedule the post for a specific date and time
  • Add to Queue (default): Add the post to the next available posting time on your posting schedule
  • Share Now: Share the post immediately
  • Share Next: If you are on one of our paid plans, you can add the post to the top of your queue and have it published next.

Scheduling options

Yay! You have just scheduled a Facebook post!

Bonus: Buffer browser extension

You can also create a Facebook post via the Buffer browser extension. For example, whenever you see a great piece of content that’s relevant to your Facebook audience, you can click on the Buffer browser extension button and share that piece of content as a scheduled Facebook post.

Here’s how the browser extension looks like:

Buffer browser extension

3 Facebook scheduling quick tips

Now, scheduling your Facebook posts is only half the story. To maximize your results on Facebook, here’s the other half: tips and tricks to ensure that your Facebook posts reach and engage as many people as possible.

Let’s go through them one by one.

1. How often to post on Facebook

When you are setting up your posting schedule, one question you might have is “How often should I be posting?”.

(The other question is likely “what times should I be posting?” We’ll cover that next!)

There likely isn’t a definite answer to this question as it depends on your audience’s preference and your capacity for creating new content. But in case it’s helpful to have a benchmark to work from, we recently studied our own Facebook Page and found that posting one to two Facebook posts per day helped us grow our reach by three times!

Facebook reach growth

This recommendation is similar to the findings of Coschedule’s research, which looked at 12 different studies on posting frequency for Facebook.

2. Best time to post on Facebook

The next question, “what times should I be posting?”

While there are many studies that suggest the “best times to post” (including ours), we’ve learned that there isn’t a set of universal best times to post on Facebook. That’s because every business has their own unique audience. What industry are you in? Where is your audience based? When are your followers checking Facebook?

All these different factors influence your best times to post. So instead of the universal best times to post, look for your best times to post.

A way to find your best times to post on Facebook is to post when your followers are online and see if that increases your reach. When your followers are active on Facebook, there might be a higher chance of them seeing and interacting with your posts. You can find that data (the following chart) in your Facebook Page Insights, under the “Posts” tab.

Facebook Insights: When your fans are online

If you would like to read more about finding your best time to post on Facebook, here’s a completed guide on that topic.

3. What can be scheduled (and what cannot be)

Finally, another crucial information to know is what can be scheduled to Facebook (and what cannot be). Knowing the limitations will allow you to better plan your social media posting in advance.

Things that can be scheduled

  • Text updates
  • Images (up to four images with Buffer)
  • Videos
  • Links

Things that cannot be scheduled

  • Photo albums
  • Events
  • Check-ins
  • GIFs

Another great thing to note is that many social media scheduling tools do not have the more advanced settings such as tagging, choosing a preferred audience, or adding a product tag. If you would like to use these features, you can do so by creating and publishing your posts on Facebook directly. (Thanks, Cara Parrish, for mentioning this!)

Over to you: What do you think of scheduling?

For many social media managers, social media scheduling tools are a lifesaver. These tools help them improve their social media performance and save them time (and their evenings and weekends).

If you have always been going to Facebook to publish your posts, scheduling your Facebook posts might sound like an unusual recommendation. If you have any thoughts or concerns about scheduling your Facebook posts, I would love to hear and discuss them with you in the comments section below.

If you would like to see how scheduling Facebook posts can help you with your Facebook marketing, we would love for you to give Buffer a try and see the difference.

Image credit: Photo by Kaylah Otto on Unsplash

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Unprivileged Docker Builds – A Proof of Concept

Article URL: https://zwischenzugs.com/2018/04/23/unprivileged-docker-builds-a-proof-of-concept/

Comments URL: https://news.ycombinator.com/item?id=16954005

Points: 22

# Comments: 5


hnrss is a labor of love, but if the project has made your job

or hobby project easier and you want to show some gratitude, <a

href=”https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=ZP9Q7QUNS3QYY”>donations are very much

appreciated. Thanks!

Emissary wants to make sales networking obsolete

There is nothing meritocratic about sales. A startup may have the best product, the best vision, and the most compelling presentation, only to discover that their sales team is talking to the wrong decision-maker or not making the right kind of small talk. Unfortunately, that critical information – that network intelligence – isn’t written down in a book somewhere or on an online forum, but generally is uncovered by extensive networking and gossip.

For David Hammer and his team at Emissary, that is a problem to solve. “I am not sure I want a world where the best networkers win,” he explained to me.

Emissary is a hybrid SaaS marketplace which connects sales teams on one side with people (called emissaries, naturally) who can guide them through the sales process at companies they are familiar with. The best emissaries are generally ex-executives and employees who have recently left the target company, and therefore understand the decision-making processes and the politics of the organization. “Our first mission is pretty simple: there should be an Emissary on every deal out there,” Hammer said.

Expert networks, such as GLG, have been around for years, but have traditionally focused on investors willing to shell out huge dollars to understand a company’s strategic thinking. Emissary’s goal is to be much more democratized, targeting a broader range of both decision-makers and customers. It’s product is designed to be intelligent, encouraging customers to ask for help before a sales process falters. The startup has raised $14 million to date according to Crunchbase, with Canaan leading the last series A round.

While Emissary is certainly a creative startup, its the questions spanning knowledge arbitrage, labor markets, and ethics it poses that I think are most interesting.

Sociologists of science generally distinguish between two forms of knowledge, concepts descended from the work of famed scholar Michael Polanyi. The first is explicit knowledge – the stuff you find in books and on TechCrunch. These are facts and figures – a funding round was this size, or the CEO of a company is this individual. The other form is tacit knowledge. The quintessential example is riding a bike – one has to learn by doing it, and no number of physics or mechanics textbooks are going to help a rider avoid falling down.

While org charts may be explicit knowledge, tacit knowledge is the core of all organizations. It’s the politics, the people, the interests, the culture. There is no handbook on these topics, but anyone who has worked in an organization long enough knows exactly the process for getting something done.

That knowledge is critical and rare, and thus ripe for monetization. That was the original inspiration for Hammer when he set out to build a new startup.“Why does Google ever make a bad decision?” Hammer asked at the time. Here you have the company with the most data in the world and the tools to search through it. “How do they not have the information they need?” The answer is that it has all the explicit knowledge in the world, but none of the implicit knowledge required.

That thinking eventually led into sales, where the information asymmetry between a customer and a salesperson was obvious. “The more I talked to sales people, the more I realized that they needed to understand how their account thinks,” Hammer said. Sales automation tools are great, but what message should someone be sending, and to who? That’s a much harder problem to solve, but ultimately the one that will lead to a signed deal. Hammer eventually realized that there were individuals who could arbitrage their valuable knowledge for a price.

That monetization creates a new labor market for these sorts of consultants. For employees at large companies, they can now leave, take a year off or even retire, and potentially get paid to talk about what they know about an organization. Hammer said that “people are fundamentally looking for ways to be helpful,” and while the pay is certainly a major highlight, a lot of people see an opportunity to just get engaged. Clearly that proposition is attractive, since the platform has more than 10,000 emissaries today.

What makes this market more fascinating long-term though is whether this can transition from a part-time, between-jobs gig into something more long-term and professional. Could people specialize in something like “how does Oracle purchase things,” much as how there is an infrastructure of people who support companies working through the government procurement system?

Hammer demurred a bit on this point, noting that “so much of that is being on the other side of those walls.” It’s not any easier for a potential consultant to learn the decision-making outside of a company than it is for a salesperson. Furthermore, the knowledge of an internal company’s processes degrades, albeit at different rates depending on the organization. Some companies experience rapid change and turnover, while knowledge of other companies may last a decade or more.

All that said, Hammer believes that there will come a tipping point when companies start to recommend emissaries to help salespeople through their own processes. Some companies who are self-aware and acknowledge their convoluted procurement procedures may eventually want salespeople to be advised by people who can smooth the process for all sides.

Obviously, with money and knowledge trading hands, there are significant concerns about ethics. “Ethics have to be at the center of what we do,” Hammer said. “They are not sharing deep confidential information, they’re sharing knowledge about the culture of the organization.” Emissary has put in place procedures to monitor ethics compliance. “Emissaries can not work with competitors at the same time,” he said. Furthermore, emissaries obviously have to have left their companies, so they can’t influence the buying decision itself.

Networking has been the millstone of every salesperson. It’s time consuming, and there is little data on what calls or coffees might improve a sale or not. If you take Emissary’s vision to its asymptote though, all that could potentially be replaced. Under the guidance of people in the know, the fits and starts of sales could be transformed into a smooth process with the right talking points at just the right time. Maybe the best products could win after all.

‘Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery’ feels like it was designed by Voldemort

Harry Potter: Hogwarts Mystery for iOS reminds me of my grad school. It’s not just because of the gothic spires or the intellectual combativeness of the students, and it’s not even because our dining hall was modeled on the same Oxford dining hall that served as the Great Hall in the films. No, instead it’s because I’m reminded at every turn that the place wants me to cough up some cash.

Developer Portkey’s new game is a free-to-play adventure that Death Eaters would be proud of. It’s free-to-play of the old, money-grubbing variety; the kind that makes you suffer through hours of waiting if you don’t drop five bucks or more to bypass it all. Had I succumbed to Hogwarts Mystery‘s every single request for cash to further the adventure, I doubtless would have already spent enough cash to buy a proper blockbuster game like the new God of War for the PS4. Had I played through the upcoming weekend that way, I probably could have spent enough to cover a student loan payment.

To read this article in full, please click here

25 of the most dangerous things science has strongly linked to cancer

cancer immunotherapy treatmentElaine Thompson/AP

Cancer is the No. 2 cause of death in the US, second only to heart disease.

It fundamentally affects the way our cells grow and divide, changing them in perverse ways. All cancer is a result of damage or genetic mutations in our DNA. The nasty, debilitating class of diseases spreads through a body like an invading army, as toxic cells grow relentlessly into unruly tumors.

Some cases of cancer are out of our control, determined by genetic defects and predispositions passed down from one generation to the next, or spurred by genetic changes we undergo through our lifetime.

But we also know that breathing in certain substances, eating specific things, and even using some kinds of plastics ups the risk of developing some deadly cancers.

Here are some known carcinogens (cancer-causers), as well as a few more things scientists are zeroing in on as prime suspects.

Sugar

Shutterstock

Scientists now know that eating too much sweet stuff can not only lead to diabetes, but actively damage your cells and increase your risk of developing cancer.

But that’s not all.

New research suggests that sugar may fuel tumor growth in the body – because cancer loves to use sugar as fuel.

“The hyperactive sugar consumption of cancerous cells leads to a vicious cycle of continued stimulation of cancer development and growth” Johan Thevelein, a Belgian molecular biologist, said in October after the release of his study.

Scientists say that the groundbreaking research gives us a better understanding of how sugar and cancer interact and that it could one day help create targeted diet strategies for patients.

Processed foods

Shutterstock

Any food that comes in a crinkly plastic wrapper, is industrially sealed, and is designed to last for months without spoiling may be a quick on-the-go fix for a hunger pang, but it’s also most likely increasing your risk of cancer.

Scientists in France recently zeroed in on a link between people who eat more processed foods and those who develop cancer.

They’re not sure yet whether the problem is the shelf-stabilizing ingredients, the plastic packaging, or some combination of the two. And because their study was correlative, it’s possible there’s some other hidden factor at work.

Smoking

arvin febry / Unsplash

Though the tobacco industry tried to cover this one up, we’ve known for years that tobacco smoke has at least 70 cancer-causing chemicals inside.

And it’s not just smokers who are affected – people who inhale secondhand smoke can develop deadly forms of cancer too.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says: “Nonsmokers who are exposed to secondhand smoke at home or at work increase their risk of developing lung cancer by 20-30%.”

People who chew their tobacco are at increased risk too.


See the rest of the story at Business Insider

See Also:

SEE ALSO: A study of more than 100,000 people has found that one food group is closely linked with cancer

How to Schedule Facebook Posts to Save Time and Get Better Results

Imagine this scenario: You have planned to post once a day on Facebook this week.

On Monday morning, you log in to Facebook and navigate to your company’s Facebook Page. You spend some time crafting the perfect post and wait for the supposed best time to post. You read that 3pm is a good time as people are taking a break from work and checking Facebook. So you wait…

At 2:55pm, you go back to the browser tab that has been opened since 10am. When the clock strikes 3pm, you hit “Publish”. Woohoo!

And then you repeat that for the next four days.

If that’s not too far from your day-to-day experience, I would love to suggest a simple tactic that can help you get better results and make you a better marketer…

Scheduling your Facebook posts.

Keen to find out more? Let’s read on.

How to Schedule Facebook Posts to Get Better Results and Save Time

Buffer can help you with Facebook scheduling, managing multiple Facebook Pages, and more. We would love for you to give it a try and see the difference.

3 benefits of scheduling your Facebook posts

You might be wondering, “the way I post on Facebook is just fine. Why do I have to change?” Well, here are three top benefits of scheduling your Facebook posts, compared with publishing it manually yourself.

(Oh, and if you are thinking that Facebook might penalize you for using a third-party tool, we’ll discuss that in just a moment.)

1. Maintain consistency and quality

The biggest benefit of scheduling your Facebook posts is to ensure that you’re posting consistently and to maintain the quality of your posts. Quantity and quality.

When you are scheduling your Facebook posts, you’re essentially planning ahead.

Buffer scheduled Facebook posts

For example, on Monday, you plan out all five posts for the week. Because you’re scheduling the posts to be published automatically, you won’t miss posting something even if you are busy – consistency. And because you dedicate time to crafting your posts in advance (rather than thinking of something on the spot every time), you can create higher quality content – quality.

2. Reach a wider audience

Publishing a post on Facebook directly is mostly fine… until you want to post at a time outside of your working hours to reach your audiences at different times of the day. You might have to excuse yourself from a dinner just to hit the publish button. Or worse, wake up in the middle of the night to do that.

When you schedule your posts, your posts will be published automatically at your chosen times. Whether it’s 7pm or 2am, it’ll almost seem like you published it manually yourself.

This way, you’ll be able to reach more people around the world who are checking Facebook at various times of their day. This is especially helpful for businesses with an international audience but also businesses in places where the population is spread across several time zones (e.g. US and Europe)1.

US population by time zone

3. Become more efficient

Finally, scheduling your Facebook posts can make you a better marketer.

According to the American Psychological Association, numerous studies have found that multitasking reduces one’s productivity. While switching between crafting a Facebook post and your other tasks for the day might not seem like much, research has found that “even brief mental blocks created by shifting between tasks can cost as much as 40 percent of someone’s productive time”.2

Multitask vs Focus

Just consider the things you can do if you get back that 40 percent of your time!3

Does Facebook penalize posts from third-party tools like Buffer?

While scheduling Facebook posts sounds attractive, many people have a concern once they research into scheduling…

Facebook doesn’t seem to like third-party tools.

It is often said that Facebook penalizes posts from third-party tools by showing the posts to fewer people organically than posts published directly on Facebook.

How true is that?

We recently did an experiment with Buffer, Hootsuite, and CoSchedule to see if that’s true. We found that there wasn’t a significant difference in reach whether we scheduled posts using a third-party tool or published posts directly on Facebook. Some scheduled posts from third-party tools even reached more people than the Facebook posts published directly on Facebook.

How to schedule Facebook posts with Buffer

So how do you schedule Facebook posts? There’re several methods.

Facebook itself offers a native feature that allows admins and editors to schedule posts to a Page or a Group. Here’s a quick guide from Facebook on how to schedule Facebook posts.

If you are managing multiple Facebook Pages (or multiple social media profiles), we hope the best way for you would be to use Buffer.

How to schedule a Facebook post in four simple steps

  1. Go to your Buffer dashboard
  2. Select your Facebook Page or profile
  3. Craft your Facebook post
  4. Schedule your post

1. Go to your Buffer dashboard

Once you’ve signed up for Buffer and connected your Facebook Page (Group or profile), you’ll be brought to your Buffer dashboard. Here’s how it’ll look like:

Buffer dashboard

2. Select your Facebook Page or profile

Next, select the Facebook Page or profile you want to post to, in the left-side column and click on the composer (“What do you want to share?”). A popup where you can craft your tweet will appear.

Buffer dashboard: Create a post

Here are two quick tips for you:

  • If you have connected multiple social media profiles to your Buffer account, be sure to select the Facebook Pages(s) that you want to schedule posts for.
  • If the post is suitable for other social media networks like Twitter, you can also select those profiles and create scheduled posts for them at the same time.

3. Craft your Facebook post

Next, let’s create some content!

What content should you be sharing? Here are some ideas (and examples) for your inspiration:

Post edu-tainment content. We found that content that is either educational or entertaining often performs well on Facebook. Best if it is both educational and entertaining (hence “edu-tainment”)!

http://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbufferapp%2Fvideos%2F1910627722342999%2F&show_text=1&width=476

Curate top content. Curating and sharing top posts from our peers in the industry has helped us grow our Facebook reach significantly. These pieces of proven content have often become our best posts in terms of reach, which also grew our engagement and Page Likes.

http://www.facebook.com/plugins/post.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbufferapp%2Fposts%2F1893490264056745&width=500

Share videos. Video has been and still is the most popular content type on Facebook. Buzzsumo conducted a research on 880 million Facebook posts found that video posts have the highest average engagement and twice the level of engagement of other post types on average4.

If you schedule videos with Buffer, your video will appear just like you uploaded it directly to Facebook – which is important for reach and engagement.

http://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Fbufferapp%2Fvideos%2F1943669395705498%2F&show_text=1&width=560

4. Schedule your Facebook post

Once you’ve crafted your post, you have a few scheduling options:

  • Schedule Posts: Schedule the post for a specific date and time
  • Add to Queue (default): Add the post to the next available posting time on your posting schedule
  • Share Now: Share the post immediately
  • Share Next: If you are on one of our paid plans, you can add the post to the top of your queue and have it published next.

Scheduling options

Yay! You have just scheduled a Facebook post!

Bonus: Buffer browser extension

You can also create a Facebook post via the Buffer browser extension. For example, whenever you see a great piece of content that’s relevant to your Facebook audience, you can click on the Buffer browser extension button and share that piece of content as a scheduled Facebook post.

Here’s how the browser extension looks like:

Buffer browser extension

3 Facebook scheduling quick tips

Now, scheduling your Facebook posts is only half the story. To maximize your results on Facebook, here’s the other half: tips and tricks to ensure that your Facebook posts reach and engage as many people as possible.

Let’s go through them one by one.

1. How often to post on Facebook

When you are setting up your posting schedule, one question you might have is “How often should I be posting?”.

(The other question is likely “what times should I be posting?” We’ll cover that next!)

There likely isn’t a definite answer to this question as it depends on your audience’s preference and your capacity for creating new content. But in case it’s helpful to have a benchmark to work from, we recently studied our own Facebook Page and found that posting one to two Facebook posts per day helped us grow our reach by three times!

Facebook reach growth

This recommendation is similar to the findings of Coschedule’s research, which looked at 12 different studies on posting frequency for Facebook.

2. Best time to post on Facebook

The next question, “what times should I be posting?”

While there are many studies that suggest the “best times to post” (including ours), we’ve learned that there isn’t a set of universal best times to post on Facebook. That’s because every business has their own unique audience. What industry are you in? Where is your audience based? When are your followers checking Facebook?

All these different factors influence your best times to post. So instead of the universal best times to post, look for your best times to post.

A way to find your best times to post on Facebook is to post when your followers are online and see if that increases your reach. When your followers are active on Facebook, there might be a higher chance of them seeing and interacting with your posts. You can find that data (the following chart) in your Facebook Page Insights, under the “Posts” tab.

Facebook Insights: When your fans are online

If you would like to read more about finding your best time to post on Facebook, here’s a completed guide on that topic.

3. What can be scheduled (and what cannot be)

Finally, another crucial information to know is what can be scheduled to Facebook (and what cannot be). Knowing the limitations will allow you to better plan your social media posting in advance.

Things that can be scheduled

  • Text updates
  • Images (up to four images with Buffer)
  • Videos
  • Links

Things that cannot be scheduled

  • Photo albums
  • Events
  • Check-ins
  • GIFs

Another great thing to note is that many social media scheduling tools do not have the more advanced settings such as tagging, choosing a preferred audience, or adding a product tag. If you would like to use these features, you can do so by creating and publishing your posts on Facebook directly. (Thanks, Cara Parrish, for mentioning this!)

Over to you: What do you think of scheduling?

For many social media managers, social media scheduling tools are a lifesaver. These tools help them improve their social media performance and save them time (and their evenings and weekends).

If you have always been going to Facebook to publish your posts, scheduling your Facebook posts might sound like an unusual recommendation. If you have any thoughts or concerns about scheduling your Facebook posts, I would love to hear and discuss them with you in the comments section below.

If you would like to see how scheduling Facebook posts can help you with your Facebook marketing, we would love for you to give Buffer a try and see the difference.

Image credit: Photo by Kaylah Otto on Unsplash

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