Shadow of the Colossus – finally, getting some hands-on with a classic


Here’s one of the secrets from my video game pile of shame. I never played Shadow of the Colossus, the hit game that came out in 2005 on the Sony PlayStation 2. But I got a chance to remedy that yesterday at a Sony event in San Francisco, where I played the remake of Shadow of the Colossus on a Sony PlayStation 4 Pro.

During 2005, I remember putting a lot of time into titles like Age of Empires III, Call of Duty 2, Battlefield 2, Guitar Hero, Sid Meier’s Civilization IV, and Lego Star Wars: The Video Game. But Shadow of the Colossus looked a little rough. The graphics were one of the drawbacks, and I didn’t really see the attraction of playing a game with 16 boss fights.

Over the years, it seemed like that was a bad decision as I’ve run into so many people who rave over it. And when Sony announced that it was doing a remake of the game during its E3 2017 trade show event, it got a roar of applause.

Above: Shadow of the Colossus remake is coming in February 2018.

Image Credit: Sony

During my gameplay session, I noticed what I didn’t see so long ago. The developers put a lot of care into delivering a believable world.

And in 4K, it comes alive. The game runs at a resolution of 4K and 60 frames per second on the PS4 Pro and 1080p and 30 fps on the standard PS4. It looks beautiful as you see the sunlight coming through the trees and mountains rising out of the distance. Back in 2005, it didn’t look nearly as good, and it played at 30 fps. Now, SIE Japan Studio and Bluepoint Games are crafting the remake to look great, but they aren’t changing much else. It still has the same number and type of creatures as the original.

As I started the mission to fight the first colossus, or boss, I looked out across a big plain. I called my horse and mounted it. Then I rode toward the mountains. In the sunlight, I checked to see where I was being guided, and I rode to a cleft between two peaks. I dismounted and climbed up the walls, learning how to maneuver both upward and sideways. I eventually saw the stamina circle that told me how much energy I had to keep climbing.

I also noticed how well done the animations were. The draw distances were huge, which meant I could see far into the distance. The sound design was awesome as my horse galloped across the terrain. The sand blowing around on the plain looked so real. The music was enchanting.

Then the colossus stomped past me, making an uncanny amount of noise. I ran after it, trying to keep pace. As I trailed it, I saw one of its legs was very furry, as if it were growing tall grasses. That, of course, was a pretty big clue. I jumped and grabbed for the grass. I hung on and kept climbing as I was getting bounced around. Then, with the square button, I stabbed my sword into a vulnerable spot on the giant’s calf. I kept at it, and the wound turned red, causing the giant to pause.

That was my cue to climb up further. I got midway and had to pause on a convenient balcony built onto the creature’s back. Then I got my stamina back and kept climbing. I crawled up the fur/grass to the top of the creature’s head, where there was another vulnerable spot. I plunged my sword into the cracks multiple times, and the creature finally went down with a crash.

Above: Shadow of the Colossus features 16 boss creatures.

Image Credit: Sony

Next, I went on to Colossus No. 13, which you see in the video. I had to ride a long distance to get to the beast, and then I used my arrows to deflate the creature’s big sacks. That caused it to start flying low. I rode my horse to catch up to his wings, which trailed near the ground. I wish I could say I mounted those wings with perfection. But in reality, I jumped for the wings and missed. And then my time was up.

Shadow of the Colossus is coming to PS4 on February 6, 2018.

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Singer Josh Groban tweeted a firsthand account of the incident in New York City that left multiple people dead

Josh grobanGetty images

  • Policesaid that multiple people are dead after an incident in New York City on Tuesday afternoon.
  • Singer Josh Groban said he was near the scene, and tweeted his firsthand account.
  • Grobandid not see anything, but saidhe “heard gunshots.”

One person is in custody following an incident that police said left multiple people dead and others injured in Manhattan, New York City, on Tuesday afternoon.

Singer Josh Groban said he was near theincident, walking his dog, and tweeted his firsthand account. Groban did not see anything, but he heard it, he said.

At leastsix people were killed after the driver of a Home Depot pickup truck reportedly struck numerous people near theWest Side Highway in downtown Manhattan. Fox Newsreportedthat the driver of the vehicle drove into the bike lane in the wrong direction for more than 10 blocks, hitting cyclists and pedestrians.

Here are Groban’s tweets referencing the incident:

Tweet Embed:

https://twitter.com/mims/statuses/925439868234354690?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Oh my god I just heard gun shots and ran with my dog. Downtown. Fuck.Tweet Embed:

https://twitter.com/mims/statuses/925445506670751750?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

I hope everyone’s ok. Was half a block from me, didn’t see it but heard 8-10 quick rounds fired off. Be safe with your kids out there.Tweet Embed:

https://twitter.com/mims/statuses/925447134924730369?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

I’m shaking. That’s the corner I was supposed to have my coffee but my dog pulled me into the park half a block away 10 min before shooting. https://t.co/AvQeRv7JhaTweet Embed:

https://twitter.com/mims/statuses/925448043440287745?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

Once I got far enough away I took this video of the quick response from our amazing NYPD and NYFD pic.twitter.com/v0nwJiqmDw

NOW WATCH: How to use the iPhone X now that the home button is dead

Watch Microsoft’s PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds Xbox stream from Paris here


The Paris Games Week event is underway now, and PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds is preparing to grab the spotlight. Microsoft is broadcasting live from the fan gathering to talk about the last-person-standing Battle Royale shooter, which is due out for the Xbox One at some point before the end of this year.

Microsoft and PlayerUnknown himself Brendan Greene will talk about what Xbox One players can expect from PUBG on the console, and it may finally announce that release date. The livestream starts at 11:30 a.m. Pacific time, and you can watch it right here:

https://mixer.com/embed/player/167395

And stick around for more PlayerUnknown’s Battlegrounds coverage on GamesBeat after the stream.

The PC Gaming channel is presented by Intel‘s Game Dev program.

Shadow of the Colossus – finally, getting some hands-on with a classic


Here’s one of the secrets from my video game pile of shame. I never played Shadow of the Colossus, the hit game that came out in 2005 on the Sony PlayStation 2. But I got a chance to remedy that yesterday at a Sony event in San Francisco, where I played the remake of Shadow of the Colossus on a Sony PlayStation 4 Pro.

During 2005, I remember putting a lot of time into titles like Age of Empires III, Call of Duty 2, Battlefield 2, Guitar Hero, Sid Meier’s Civilization IV, and Lego Star Wars: The Video Game. But Shadow of the Colossus looked a little rough. The graphics were one of the drawbacks, and I didn’t really see the attraction of playing a game with 16 boss fights.

Over the years, it seemed like that was a bad decision as I’ve run into so many people who rave over it. And when Sony announced that it was doing a remake of the game during its E3 2017 trade show event, it got a roar of applause.

Above: Shadow of the Colossus remake is coming in February 2018.

Image Credit: Sony

During my gameplay session, I noticed what I didn’t see so long ago. The developers put a lot of care into delivering a believable world.

And in 4K, it comes alive. The game runs at a resolution of 4K and 60 frames per second on the PS4 Pro and 1080p and 30 fps on the standard PS4. It looks beautiful as you see the sunlight coming through the trees and mountains rising out of the distance. Back in 2005, it didn’t look nearly as good, and it played at 30 fps. Now, SIE Japan Studio and Bluepoint Games are crafting the remake to look great, but they aren’t changing much else. It still has the same number and type of creatures as the original.

As I started the mission to fight the first colossus, or boss, I looked out across a big plain. I called my horse and mounted it. Then I rode toward the mountains. In the sunlight, I checked to see where I was being guided, and I rode to a cleft between two peaks. I dismounted and climbed up the walls, learning how to maneuver both upward and sideways. I eventually saw the stamina circle that told me how much energy I had to keep climbing.

I also noticed how well done the animations were. The draw distances were huge, which meant I could see far into the distance. The sound design was awesome as my horse galloped across the terrain. The sand blowing around on the plain looked so real. The music was enchanting.

Then the colossus stomped past me, making an uncanny amount of noise. I ran after it, trying to keep pace. As I trailed it, I saw one of its legs was very furry, as if it were growing tall grasses. That, of course, was a pretty big clue. I jumped and grabbed for the grass. I hung on and kept climbing as I was getting bounced around. Then, with the square button, I stabbed my sword into a vulnerable spot on the giant’s calf. I kept at it, and the wound turned red, causing the giant to pause.

That was my cue to climb up further. I got midway and had to pause on a convenient balcony built onto the creature’s back. Then I got my stamina back and kept climbing. I crawled up the fur/grass to the top of the creature’s head, where there was another vulnerable spot. I plunged my sword into the cracks multiple times, and the creature finally went down with a crash.

Above: Shadow of the Colossus features 16 boss creatures.

Image Credit: Sony

Next, I went on to Colossus No. 13, which you see in the video. I had to ride a long distance to get to the beast, and then I used my arrows to deflate the creature’s big sacks. That caused it to start flying low. I rode my horse to catch up to his wings, which trailed near the ground. I wish I could say I mounted those wings with perfection. But in reality, I jumped for the wings and missed. And then my time was up.

Shadow of the Colossus is coming to PS4 on February 6, 2018.

Google Tez sees early success in India (GOOGL, GOOG)

Global Mobile WalletBI Intelligence

This story was delivered to BI Intelligence “Payments Briefing” subscribers. To learn more and subscribe, please click here.

During Google’s Q3 2017 earnings call, the firm announced that it’d seen earlyadoptionof Tez, its proprietary mobile payment platform, in India.

Tez operates on a proprietarytechnology called Audio QR – the technology uses sound waves to send payment information between phones in proximity, without the need for personal information, NFC chips, or QR codes.

Italready has more than 7.5 million users, and has seen more than 30 million transactions since its launch in September. But it’s no surprise that Google’s seen early success in India.

Consumers in India have been quick to adopt and use digital payments technology following demonetization.In fall 2016, theIndian government removed 86% of currency from circulation, which was a system shock to a region that relied heavily on cash. This led to asurge in digital and mobile payments, which became convenient alternatives for those seeking tocomplete transactions. Similar to Paytm, India’s largest mobilewallet, Google likely hopes totake advantage of these changing payment habits – Paytm added 20 million users in the first month after demonetization, and over 50 million justthree months later.

Although Google is unlikely to see the same growth as Paytm, which was already established at the time of demonetization, it still has the ability to carve out a significant share of the market.Tez offers a suite of payment tools, including the ability to make online and in-app payments as well as peer-to-peer (P2P) payments. As an added convenience to consumers, the service doesn’t require users to exchange personal information, and it avoids some of the pitfalls of NFC-, Bluetooth-, and QR-based solutions. The mobile payment platform alsocomes preloaded on some lower-end smartphones made by companies like Nokia and Panasonic, which gives it a distribution channel that most wallets in India don’t have.

European and North American countries with advanced economiesoften serve asbellwethers forthe payments industry when it comes to introducing new and disruptive technologies.

However, some of the greatest examples of digital payments disruptioncan be foundin developing nations.In somecases, these countries not only adopt certain aspects of adigital payments ecosystem faster, butthey also do so with more efficiency than theirWestern counterparts.

The fact that digitaldisruptionin these regions can be complex and varied, makes it difficult for the industry to devise effective strategies for international expansion- butunderstanding the drivers of thisdisruptioncan significantly aid payments companies.

Ayoub Aouad, research analyst for BI Intelligence, Business Insider’s premium research service, has compiled a detailed report on payments disruption that:

  • Identifies thebiggest drivers that are upending the payments industries in India, East Africa, Latin America, and Australia.
  • Discusses what pain points digital payment services are solving.
  • Details what specific technologies and services are being introduced that consumers are embracing, which can be leveraged by companies in these regions that are ripe for disruption.
  • Assesses how leaders in the space can leverage these trends to either improve their capabilities or to identify which markets may be ripe for disruption and worth exploring.
  • And much more

Interested in getting the full report? Here are twoways to access it:

  1. Subscribe to anAll-Accesspass to BI Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you’ll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensureyou stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn MoreNow
  2. Purchase & download the full report fromour research store. >> Purchase & Download Now

Those aren’t Problems. Those are Customers!

I work with companies around the world as a Customer Success consultant, I speak at events, and I do workshops.

I’m constantly teaching others about Customer Success.

And even more, I’m constantly learning.

My understanding of Customer Success is constantly evolving.

As I am exposed to what’s working and what’s not both at a conceptual or strategic level and the day-to-day tactical level, I am continually evaluating and refining my approach to this incredibly complex and valuable business function.

But sometimes I learn something that doesn’t change anything but the way I talk about Customer Success and it’s core principles.

Often it’s a change that exponentially improves my ability to get the point across.

And that change usually comes directly from the people I’m working with.

Here’s an example of one of those changes.

We have a problem

In my public workshops we usually have different groups of people from different companies sitting at their own tables (depending upon the configuration of the room).

At a recent workshop in Brazil, there was this one company that called me over during our working session because they needed some help.

The spokesperson for the gorup said: Lincoln, we have some problems.

She said that they worked with real estate agents, and they were telling me that their real estate agents don’t care about technology, are very impatient, want everything done for them, etc..

I don’t remember exactly what all the specifics were, but they kept saying these things, and I said, You’re not describing problems. You’re describing customer characteristics.

By the way, I’ve heard this for years from companies about their customers. Those customers include:

  • Lawyers
  • Oil & Gas Companies
  • Fitness Professionals
  • Startup Founders
  • Entrepreneurs
  • You (I’ve probably heard you or a company like yours described as a problem)

At some point, especially if they haven’t been customer-centric in the past or haven’t been deliberate in their customer acquision and growth, people in most companies will start to describe customers as problems.

Because they weren’t deliberate in their growth or because they lost focus on why they as a company exist in the market (it’s to make customers successful if you didn’t know), they become the victim of their customer.

They start saying negative things about their customers and they start looking at the things that make their customers their customers as problems.

No, You Have Customers

What I said Those aren’t Problems. Those are Customers. was an interesting and different way of looking at it than they had been thinking about originally.

It was, in fact, a somewhat profound mindset shift that occurred. One that is required if you want to actually do Customer Success and get the well-documented benefits.

I want you take a step back and say, when you complain about your customers, when you bring up these issues or problems that you have, are they actually problems? Are they actually issues? Or are they just customer characteristics?

Your Limited Options

What I said to that group there in the workshop, and what I’ll say to you, is if they’re customer characteristics, you basically have two choices.

One, find a different type of customer.

Two, and this is where we’d normally talk about Ideal Customer Profile, Success Potential, Bad Fit Customers, and all that stuff.

But, if they’re a good fit, and this is the type of customer you want to do business with, then the other option is to figure out how to work around their unique characteristics.

That’s all.

You only have two choices.

A Third (Bad) Option

Well, I guess you have a third choice, which is just continue complaining about it and try to force whatever experience you want vs. their actual Appropriate Experience (AX) on them, even though it doesn’t fit their known characteristics.

That’s going to create a Cycle of Apathy as you deliver the wrong experience, your customers are not successful, you blame them, continuing the cycle. Ultimately and probably sooner rather than later this will end up being bad for everybody,

You don’t have a problem, you have a customer.

Hopefully that’s a mindset shift that helps a little bit.

The post Those aren’t Problems. Those are Customers! appeared first on Customer Success-driven Growth.

AOC Portable 16-Inch Monitor Offers Options to Small Business Owners on the Go

AOC i1601fwux Monitor is 16-Inches and Weighs Less Than 2 Pounds

If you are looking for a very slim, lightweight, and easy to use portable external monitor that is also affordable, the new AOC i1601fwux ticks all of those boxes. With people working outside of the office just as much as they do in it, portability is an important quality, even for an external monitor.

The i1601fwux is powered by a USB-C cable, which brings the 15.6 inch 1080p high-end IPS panel to life. This means you won’t have to lug additional cables to power the monitor. Plug the single USB-C into your laptop and you are ready to go.

For many small business owners, the office is now anywhere they can take their computing device and make their presentation. This can be achieved with everything from a smartphone to a tablet, laptop or projector. With monitors or displays playing key roles, having a portable device that can be plugged in easily can make things much easier.

The Specs for the AOC i1601fwux Monitor

Weighing in at only 1.81 pounds or 0.24kg, and measuring only 8.3mm thick (which by the way is only 1mm thicker than the iPhone 8) the monitor can easily be taken to your next meeting. In addition to the monitor itself, the USB-C cable is the only thing you need because you won’t have to carry a dedicated power cord or VGA cable.

AOC i1601fwux Monitor is 16-Inches and Weighs Less Than 2 Pounds

The IPS monitor has a 700:1 contrast ratio with 5ms response time and a maximum resolution of 19201080 at 60Hz with a color depth of 262K. Once you plug it in, you can use the stand that comes with the monitor to horizontally or vertically place the monitor and view the 16:9 aspect ratio display.

Benefit of an IPS Panel

An In Plane Switching (IPS) panel is better than TN or Twisted Nematic panel because it has its own set of subpixels to produce better colors without distortions. For freelancers and small business owners making digital presentations, the IPS monitor will deliver higher quality images. Forpresentation with many images or videos, this could prove to be the difference in swaying a client to make a decision.

Price and Availability

The AOC i1601fwux is now available for $190.00 on Amazon.

Images: AOC

This article, “AOC Portable 16-Inch Monitor Offers Options to Small Business Owners on the Go” was first published on Small Business Trends

What you need to know in advertising today

Screen Shot 2017 10 30 at 10.19.23 AMHallmark

Hallmarkreleased the first of 33 original Christmas movies – most featuring a pair of recognizable TV stars meeting cute near the mistletoe – this weekend – before we’re even done with Halloween.

Hallmark, it seems, has never stopped saying Merry Christmas, and it’s how the network, owned by Crown Media, is defying every trend in the media business. It has milked the Christmas stories to consistently deliver strong live ratings (meaning people watch when the movies are broadcast, not later, say, over the internet), while its rivals grapple with cablecord-cuttingand competition from streaming services.

For marketers, Hallmark has become a feel-good, brand-safe home for their ads, helping the network grow its advertising revenues at a time when others are facing declines.

To get a peek into the cable network’s playbook, click here.

In other news:

Facebook will require full transparency for political advertisers and other businesses too. Facebook, Twitter and Google all have theircongressional hearings about alleged Russian interference on their platforms during and after last year’s U.S. election this week.

Speaking of Facebook, Mark Zuckerburg isback in China as Facebook eyes an opportunity to finally enter the country. While Facebook’s service has been banned in China since 2009, the social network recently tapped William Shuai from LinkedIn to lead relations with the Chinese government.

And on the other hand, Twitteroutlined how it will be tougher on banning revenge porn. The company laid out the specific kinds of tweets featuring “intimate media” that it will take action on inan update to its website on Friday.

Amazon’s bookstores are generating almost no revenue.There are a few reasons why including the fact that there aren’t that many of them yet.

Google CEO Sundar Pichai joked that he would drop everything else on Monday to address the cheese placement in Google’s burger emoji.Apple has it on top, but Google has it on the bottom.

E-sports just got closer to being part of the Olympics. The International Olympic Committee recently said that e-sports gaming could be a sanctioned sport for the Games as it sees it asa promising way to growviewershipwith younger audiences.

NBC News has terminated Mark Halperin’s contract. Halperin’s termination follows multiple accusations that he harassed and abused women while at ABC News.

A scientist trained AI to come up with Halloween costume ideas.The results are fascinating.

BuzzFeedwants to help entrepreneurs sell their stuff,Recode reports. The company’s new revenue experiment will involve creating content and ads for gadget makers and inventors, in return for a cut of their sales.

Wal-Mart is pitching its advertising business to ad buyers by promoting itself as a media platform, reportsDigiday.Walmart’s pitch is that it controls transaction datafrom customers, which can help brands retargetconsumers off Walmart.com, according to executives familiar with the matter.

Join us at IGNITION: Future of Media!Future of Mediais November 29-30 in New York City. We hope to see you there!

Follow us at@BI_Corporateto be among the first to hear about news and updates from Business Insider.

Also,sign up for theExecutive Summary, a new biweekly newsletter that brings the latest marketing news, trends, and company updates straight to your inbox.

NOW WATCH: The 5 most annoying changes in the new iPhone update – and how to fix them

Voice interfaces will revolutionize patient engagement


The healthcare industry is abuzz over consumer engagement and empowerment, spurred by a strong belief that when patients become more engaged in their own care, better outcomes and reduced costs will result.

Nevertheless, from the perspective of many patients, navigating the healthcare ecosystem is anything but easy.

Consider the familiar use case of booking a doctor’s appointment. The vast majority of appointments are still scheduled by phone. Booking the appointment takes on average ten minutes, and the patient can be on hold for nearly half of that time.

These are the kinds of inefficiencies that compound one another across the healthcare system, resulting in discouraged patients who aren’t optimally engaged with their care. For example, the system’s outdated infrastructure and engagement mechanisms also contribute to last-minute cancellations and appointment no-shows-challenges to operational efficiency that cost U.S. providers alone as much as $150 billion annually.

Similarly, long waits for appointments and the convoluted process of finding a doctor are among the biggest aggravations for U.S. patients seeking care. A recent report by healthcare consulting firm Merritt Hawkins found that appointment wait times in large U.S. cities has increased 30 percent since 2014.

It’s time for this to change. Many healthcare providers are beginning to modernize, but moving from phone systems to online scheduling, though important, is only the tip of the iceberg. Thanks to new platforms and improved approaches to integration of electronic medical records (EMR), the potential for rapid transformation has arguably never been greater.

This transformation will take many shapes-but one particularly excites me: voice. While scheduling and keeping a doctor’s appointment might be challenging today, it’s not far-fetched to envision a near future in which finding a doctor may be as simple as telling your favorite voice-controlled digital assistant, Find me a dermatologist within 15 miles of my office who has morning availability in the next two weeks and schedule me an appointment.

How voice has evolved in healthcare: The rise of technology platforms

Voice technologies have been generating excitement in the healthcare space for years. Because doctors can speak more quickly than they can type or write, for example, the industry has been tantalized by the promise of natural language processing services that translate spoken doctors’ notes into electronic text.

No single company or healthcare provider holds all the keys to this revolution. Rather, it hinges on a variety of players leveraging technology platforms to create ecosystems of patient care. These ecosystems are possible because, in contrast to even a few years ago, it’s eminently more feasible to make software interoperate-and thus to combine software into richer services.

Developers can leverage application programming interfaces (APIs) that provide access to natural language processing, image analysis, and other services, enabling them to build these capabilities into their apps without creating the underlying machine learning infrastructure, for example.

These apps can also leverage other APIs to connect disparate systems, data, and applications, anything from a simple microservice that surfaces inventory for medical supplies to FHIR-compliant APIs that allow access to patient data in new, more useful contexts. Understanding the possibilities and challenges of connecting these modern interfaces to EMR systems, which generally do not easily support modern interoperability, may be one of the biggest obstacles. Well over a quarter-million health apps exist, but only a fraction of these can connect to provider data. If voice-enabled health apps follow the same course, flooding the market without an approach to EMR interoperability, it could undermine the potential of these voice experiences to improve care.

Fortunately, as more providers both move from inflexible, aging software development techniques such as SOA to modern API-first approaches and adapt the FHIR standard, these obstacles should diminish. FHIR APIs allow providers to focus on predictable programming interfaces instead of underlying systems complexity, empowering them to replace many strained doctor-patient interactions with new paradigms.

As it becomes simpler for developers to work with EMR systems alongside voice interfaces and other modern platforms, the breadth and depth of new healthcare services could dramatically increase. Because developers can work with widely adopted voice assistants such as Google Assistant, Apple’s Siri, and Amazon’s Alexa, these new services won’t need to be confined to standalone apps. Instead, they can seamlessly integrate care and healthier activity into a user’s day-to-day routines.

Many of us already talk to our devices when we want information on things like traffic conditions, movie times, and weather forecasts. Likewise, many of us are already accustomed to taking advice from our digital assistants, such as when they point out conflicts on our calendars or advise us to leave in order to make it to a meeting on time. It’s natural these interfaces will expand to include new approaches to care: encouraging patients to exercise, reminding them to take medications, accelerating diagnoses by making medical records more digestible and complete, facilitating easier scheduling, etc.

Indeed, research firm Gartner’s recent Top 10 Strategic Technology Trends for 2018 speaks to the potential of voice and other conversational interaction models: These platforms will continue to evolve to even more complex actions, such as collecting oral testimony from crime witnesses and acting on that information by creating a sketch of the suspect’s head based on the testimony.

As voice and other interfaces continue to evolve from scripted answers to more sophisticated understandings of user intent and more extemporaneous, context-aware ways of providing service, the nature of daily routines will change. For example, whereas many patients today feel anxiety over finding the time and focus to pursue better care, in the near future, this stress will likely diminish as more healthcare capabilities are built into platforms and interaction models consumers already use.

What comes next?

It’s clear that providers feel the urgency to improve patient engagement and operational efficiency. Research firm Accenture, for example, predicts that by the end of 2019, two-thirds of U.S. health systems will offer self-service digital scheduling, producing $3.2 billion in value. That’s a start, but there’s much more to do.

More capabilities will need to be developed and made available via productized APIs, platforms will need to continue to grow and evolve, and providers must adopt operational approaches that allow them to innovate at a breakneck pace while still complying with safety and privacy regulations.

But even though work remains, voice platforms and new approaches to IT architecture are already changing how patients and doctors interact. As more interoperability challenges are overcome, the opportunities for voice to be a meaningful healthcare interface are remarkable.

For the biggest changes, the question likely isn’t if they will happen but how quickly.

Aashima Gupta is the global head of healthcare solutions for Google Cloud Platform where she spearheads healthcare solutions for Google Cloud.